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Outcry Over 'Future Footballers Wife' Caps Aimed At Young Girls

A bright pink cap with the slogan "Future Footballers Wife" [sic] has been withdrawn from sale after complaints of sexism.

Creative director Laura Goss noticed the hat - clearly marketed at young girls - while on a Bank Holiday visit to the gift shop at Tatton Park, a stately home in Cheshire owned by the National Trust.

She uploaded a snap of the product on Twitter, calling out both the offensive message and its glaring lack of an apostrophe:

Laura's tweet quickly struck a nerve, as hundreds of people shared the photo and added their voices to a growing barrage of criticism.

Various users slammed the hat as "tacky", "sexist" and "disgusting"; as well as wholly lacking in aspiration for young girls.

Others pointed out that the hat was not merely offensive, but also contributed to everyday sexism and damaged the uphill battle for equal opportunities between boys and girls.

Still more people threatened to withdraw their National Trust membership - although, as the organisation pointed out, Tatton Park is entirely managed by Cheshire East Council.

Facing a backlash that showed no sign of losing pace, the National Trust contacted the council, who agreed to remove the product from sale:

The hat is not at sale at any other National Trust properties, but the incident shows how important it is to promote gender equality in marketing to children.

In an age where the gender pay gap lingers at 18.1% and women are massively under-represented at board level, it's vital we take every opportunity to show young girls that anything is possible and the sky's the limit when it comes to ambition and drive.

Read More: London Estate Agents To Remove 'Awful, Retrograde' Tube Adverts After Sexism Backlash

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